Thursday, December 29, 2011

Fuzzy Wuzzy Wrist Warmers

A couple of years ago, I made a set of wrist warmers out of chenille yarn for my step-sister. She has worn them out now, and this pair was designed to be a warm but sturdy replacement. (Hence the cotton cuffs)

Hook: 5.0 mm
Yarn: I love this Cotton (worsted Weight) and some sort of fuzzy yarn I had in my stash.
Gauge/Size: I tend to stitch large and this makes EXTRA SMALL wrist warmers for a small adult or a child size. If you want to make an adult size, you’ll have to modify to add stitches [just follow along in the brackets to adjust sizing]

TOP CUFF (Make 2)
Begin with the cotton yarn. Ch 7
Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st across
Row 2-22: ch 1, sc in the BACK LOOP ONLY of each st across
[This should fit around your hand, or the hand of the person it’s for. Add more rows if the strip doesn’t wrap around. Your total number of rows will become N for the remainder of the pattern.]
Finishing Row: Sl st onto the back of the base chain so that it forms a loop. Fasten off or leave a large loop where you can join your fuzzy yarn later.

BOTTOM CUFF (make 2)
Begin with the cotton yarn. Ch 7
Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each st across
Row 2-20: ch 1, sc in the BACK LOOP ONLY of each st across
[This should fit around your wrist, and in general, the number of rows to achieve that is N-2]
Finishing Row: Sl st onto the back of the base chain so that it forms a loop. Fasten off.

FUZZY WARM PART:
Join your fuzzy yarn onto the top cuff where you fastened off the cotton yarn.
Rnd 1: Ch 1, sc 22 [or N] sts around. Sl st to join
Row 2: Ch 3, dc in each st around. DO NOT JOIN. Turn. (this creates thumb opening)
Row 3: Ch 3, dc in each st around. DO NOT JOIN. Turn.
Row 4: Ch 3, dc in each st around. Sl st to the top of the ch 3 to join for the bottom of the thumb.
Rnd 5: Ch 3, dc2tog over next 2 sts. Dc in each of the next 9 sts. Dc2tog over next 2 sts, dc in each of the next 9 sts to finish the rnd. Sl st to join. (20 sts) [N-2 sts]
Rnd 6. Ch 3, dc2tog over next 2 sts. Dc in each of the next 8 sts. Dc2tog over next 2 sts, dc in each of the next 8 sts to finish the rnd. Sl st to join. (18 sts) [N-4 sts]
Rnd 7: Ch 3, dc2tog over next 2 sts. Dc in each of the next 7 sts. Dc2tog over next 2 sts, dc in each of the next 7 sts to finish the rnd. Sl st to join. (16 sts) [N-6 sts]
[If you want your cuffs to be longer, add a round or two of *ch 3, dc in each st around, slst to join*]
Rnd 8: Pin or hold the bottom cuff in place, and sl st the bottom of the fuzzy part onto the top of the bottom cuff. Fasten Off.



Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Super Scrubby


“Yarn”: 6” wide Tulle, 12yds (I find spools of this in the $1 bin at Joann’s, sometimes the $2 bin)
Hook: 10.0mm (N)
Special Stitches: fsc (foundation single crochet)
See this youtube tutorial I found: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZrabIcA8C8
Working with the tulle as opposed to yarn, you ‘ll need to pull it a bit tight to make it all work like yarn, but its very cool once you get the hang of it.

PATTERN:
Ch 4, sl st to form ring.
Rnd 1: 8sc into ring, sl st to join.
Rnd 2: Ch 3, 2dc into each sc of previous rnd. Sl st to top of ch 3 to join.
Handle: from where you’re at on the circle, fsc 9sts. Then ch 1 and turn, working back towards the ring, and sc in each fsc until you get back to the circle, and sl st into the back loop of the next st of the circle to join it.
You should now be looking at the wrong side of the circle. Push the handle strap to the back of your work and TRY to ignore it. (3rd pic)
Rnd 3: Ch 3 and *dc2tog over the next 2 dc of Rnd 2* repeat this around, ignoring the handle and using a sl st to join to the top of the ch 3.
Rnd 4: Ch 1, *sc2tog over next two dcs of previous rnd* repeat until you’re back to where you started. Sl st to the top of the ch1 (if you can find it). I sometimes have to add another sl st somewhere in the middle to close the hole, and then fasten off.

I usually have 12”-24” of tulle remaining at this point, which I use to knot the handle strap onto the other side of the scrubby.  The scrubby itself is essentially a little puff, so go ahead and jam your ends inside to stuff it up (once they’re tied off securely). These guys work REALLY well, plus the handle and the puffy aspect helps to keep your fingers from getting chewed up. They can also be run through the washer with the rest of your dishcloths and towels, though I don’t put them in the dryer.

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Easy Kitchen Set

This is a great set that can be given in whole or in part as a gift, or used to add some color to your kitchen. My sister bought new plates in these colors, and asked if I could update her fabrics to match. It IS important to choose a cotton yarn for this, as it is absorbent and easily washable. The scrubbie, however, is made from tulle.
Check out the Super Scrubby Pattern.

SHELL STITCH DISH TOWEL

Yarn: Lily Sugar and Cream Cotton (120 yds each of Hot Orange, and Hot Green, 140 yds Red)
Hook: 6.5mm
Ch 61 (or any multiple of 6 + 1 for the turning chain)
Row 1: sc in 2nd ch * skip 2 ch, 5 dc in following st, skip 2 ch, sc in next ch* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row. Turn.
Row 2: Ch 3, 2dc in sc from prev row. * skip 2 sts, sc in next dc (top of shell), skip 2 dc, 5dc in sc from previous row*. Repeat from * to * until the last sc. 3 dc into final sc. Turn.
Row 3: Ch 1, sc into first dc. * skip 2 dc, 5dc into sc from previous row, skip 2 dc, sc into next dc (top of shell)*. Repeat from * to * until the end of the row. Turn.
Repeat rows 2 + 3 until you have a total of 36 rows.
Finishing Row: Ch 1, *sc into first st (top of shell). Hdc in next 2dcs, dc into sc, hdc in next 2 dcs, and sc into the next st (top of shell)* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row. DO NOT TURN. Continue working around the edge of the dishcloth, adding a sc border around the remaining 3 sides (or 4 if you like). This will work in the ends of your carried or tied off yarn. Sl st to join once you get all the way around, and fasten off.
Notes: with 3 colors, changing colors every row allowed me to carry the yarn along the side quite nicely. With fewer colors or a different combination, you may have to tie off, leaving more bulk to cover with your sc border.

SIMPLE DISH CLOTH
Yarn: Lily Sugar and Cream Cotton (50-75yds Red)
Hook: 6.5mm

Ch 25, dc in 3rd ch from hook and in each st across.
Rows: Ch 3 and dc in each st across.
Work row pattern until the cloth is square, then add a sc border around all 4 sides to add stability. Sl st to join border and fasten off. 


Using the 25 st base chain, you can add on any stitch you want, and edge it with a row or two of sc. This is a GREAT way to practice new stitches or patterns that you want to use for an afghan, without all the commitment.

Lilac Meadows Hobo Bag


Yarn: Red Heart Super Saver (Stash scraps)
Hook: 6.5mm

Abbreviations:
YO: Yarn over
sc: single crochet
hdc: half-double crochet
dc: double crochet
tch: turning chain
xdc: crossed dc (see special sts below)

SPECIAL STITCHES:
dc2tog in same stitch (rnd 29): YO, insert hook into st, yo again and draw up a loop. YO and pull through 2 loops on hook. Yo again, insert hook into SAME st, yo again and draw up a loop (4 loops on hook). YO and pull through 2 loops. YO and pull through 3 loops.
dc2tog over 2 sts (handles): YO, insert hook into st, yo again and draw up a loop. YO and pull through 2 loops on hook. Yo again, insert hook into NEXT st, yo again and draw up a loop (4 loops on hook). YO and pull through 2 loops. YO and pull through 3 loops.
Crossed dcs or xdcs (rnd 30): skip next st, dc in following st. dc in the skipped st.
Half puff stitch (rnd 31): YO, insert hook into st, yo again and draw up a loop. YO again, insert hook into st again, YO and pull up a loop. This gives you 5 loops on your hook. YO and pull through all 5 loops. (You’ll have to do this loosely if you’re not used to doing puff sts.) . Ch 1 to close the top of the st.

PATTERN:
With Dark Green: Ch 4, sl st to join.
Rnd 1: ch 1, Sc 10 sts into ring. Sl st to join.
Rnd 2: ch 1, 2sc into each sc of prev rnd. Sl st to join.
Rnd 3: Ch 1, *2sc in next st, 1sc in following st* around, Sl st to join.
Rnd 4: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 2 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 5: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 4 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 6: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 5 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 7: Ch 1, sc in each st around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 8: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 6 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 9: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 8 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 10: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 10 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 11-12: Ch 1, *2 sc in next st, 1sc in each of the following 12 sts* around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 13: Ch 1, sc in each st around. Sl st to join.
Swap colors to light green.
Rnd 14-16: Ch 1, sc in each st around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 17: Ch 2, hdc in each st around. Sl st to join.
Rnd 18: Ch 3, dc in each st around. Sl st to join.
Repeat Rnds 17+18 (alternating hdc and dc rows) for rnds 19-27 or until your bag is 2/3 as deep as you want it to be. (you NEED the hdc rnds to add stability here, since one comment I have seen on many hobo bag patterns is that the dc rnds alone make it “bowl shaped”)
Swap colors to Dark Green.

Rnd 28: Ch 2, hdc in each st around. Sl st to join. (At the end of this rnd, you want to have a multiple of 5 sts, so somewhere along the way you may have to add one or hdc2tog. Sorry to make you have to fudge it, but I messed around with the pattern so much at this point, I had to as well.)
Rnd 29: Ch 1, *sc in next 2 sts, ch 1. Skip next st. in the following st (dc2tog, ch 1, dc2tog). Ch 1 and skip next st* repeat from * to * around.  Sl st to join.
Rnd 30: ch 3,*xdc over the next 2 sts, ch 2, dc into the st from rnd 28 where you already did (dc2tog, ch 1, dc2tog). The stitch will be crowded, but its ok. Ch 2.* repeat from * to * around. Sl st to join.
Join Lavendar yarn, but carry it behind for a few sts.
Rnd 31: ch 1, *sc in each of the next 2 sts with dark green, skip the 2 ch sts of the previous rnd, and do 3 half-puff sts into the top of the tall dc using the lavender yarn* repeat from * to * around, and sl st to join.
After this rnd, switch to the light green only.
Rnd 32: ch 3, *dc in each of the next 2 sts, ch 1, skip the first half-puff, sc in top of the center half-puff from the previous rnd, ch 1 and skip the third half-puff st*.
Rnd 33-34: ch 2, hdc in each st around. Sl st to join. (yay for simple things!)
(if you want your bag to be deeper still, you can add a few more rnds of hdc sts at this point, otherwise, continue on to the handles)
Handles will be 16 sts wide, so mark where you would like them to go with safety pins. For the first handle, I just continued working from where I was at, but you can always fasten off and re-join the yarn wherever you want it.
 
HANDLE:

Row 1: ch 1, sc in next st, hdc in following st, dc in each of the following 12 sts, hdc in next st, sc in last st.  Turn
Row 2: Sl st into the top of the sc and hdc from the prev row. sl st + ch 3 into the top of the first dc from the previous row. dc2tog over the next 2 dcs. Dc in each of the next 7 sts. Dc2tog over next 2 dcs. Dc in last dc.
Row 3-6: Ch 3, dc2tog over next 2 dcs. Dc in each st across until the last 2 sts. Dc2tog over last 2 sts, dc into tch.
Row 17-16: Ch 3, dc into each st across (but NOT into tch). Fasten off leaving a long tail.
For the second handle, join the yarn and repeat the pattern. Once both handles are made, sl st them together at the top of the handle using the long tails you left.

Using the dark green (or lavender), join the yarn at the base of one handle and sc around the edge of each handle and along the top of the bag.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Tatting - yet another insane craft

So I visited St. Louis the first weekend in December, and yes, my craft enabler Vicky helped me get hooked onto another craft: Tatting.

So tatting is the "lost art" of making knotted lace. You use the same lace weight cotton or bamboo threads you would use for crochet lace, but its much more sturdy and requires less starch. I'm slow moving with the project, and even worse because I'm making an item for myself, and those tend to not rank so highly on the priority list at holiday time.

Anyways, I can't wait until after Christmas, because then I'll be able to share with you all the cool crochet/knit patterns I've been using to make presents, along with 3 or 4 original patterns I've come up with to make gifts! I can't wait!

Oh, and I just added some new links to the side bar to the right! So check out the "How much yarn do I need?" yardage chart from Lion Brand, and the Craftyminx Crochet School tutorials!

Monday, December 12, 2011

Telephone Pictionary

This is one of those games that I can't help but share. Its a combination of Pictionary and telephone (as the name suggests) where the starting phrase will get transformed by way of drawings and guesses. You don't need any skill at the actual game of Pictionary in order to play. All you have to be able to do is draw a stick figure. Poorly.
Everyone wins, everyone laughs, and everyone has fun.

Supplies:
5+ Players (More is fine, but it doesn't work with less)
One sheet of paper per player (per round)
One pen/pencil per player
Writing surface for each player (that's not too crowded, you need a bit of room)

Gameplay:
1. Each player gets a sheet of paper and writes their name in the lower right corner. Then, within the top 1" of the paper, they write their starting sentence. It can be a quote, a song lyric, a song title, a random phrase, or anything else you so please. Minimum of three words is suggested.
2. Each player should then fold over the top of the paper so that it just covers the writing. Everyone should then pass the folded paper to the player to their immediate left.
3. As each player receives the new game paper, they will unfold the flap to reveal the phrase. FOLD the flap back down FIRST, and then use the next 1"-2" of paper to DRAW the phrase you've just read. Pictionary rules apply (no words, etc). Be quick. Use stick figures. You don't need to be an artist.
4. Once you've finished drawing, you'll fold over the paper again (leaving the initial fold shut) so that the picture you just drew is hidden. Pass left again.
5. This time, you open the paper to reveal the picture (you should not be able to see the original phrase). Fold the paper back over, and in the next 1" of space beneath THAT fold, you'll write what you guess the picture means. Sometimes you can guess the original phrase, but oftentimes you just have to write what you see. Not having a clue is part of the fun!
6. After writing the new phrase, fold the paper so that it covers the phrase (by now the folding starts to get awkward, so just do your best to keep it so the next person can see the phrase you wrote, but not the picture before it.) Pass left again.
7. Repeat the drawing phase outlines in step 3. Fold again and pass left.
8. This is the last stage. This person will repeat step 5, creating the final interpretation phrase. Once everyone completes this step, you can unfold the whole page to see where the phrase got started. Laugh at the changes the phrase went through and then pass it back to the person who started it.

Game Notes:
This game is better when nobody is easily offended.
Please recycle your game papers! Use the backs even!
If you have more than 5 people, you still only want to pass it 4 times (as described above).
If someone mucks up the folding, which they will, just try not to peek at the words/pictures that you're not supposed to see.
Have a few drinks while you play, it gets far more entertaining.
Before you write down a phrase, keep in mind that someone has to try and draw it. (And that you'll end up seeing that picture. And that you can't un-see something.)
Pictionary rules apply, but we allow "house rules" where you can use symbols, roman numerals, etc to help you. No English letters or words!

Monday, December 5, 2011

Baby Blankets

It always seems like its that season, time to make baby blankets for my friends who are expecting. I have a BUNCH more to get made after the holiday season, but these were the only two that needed to get done pronto!

I found both patterns through Ravelry, and I think they both worked up quite well.

Sweet Baby Boy Blanket
Pattern Link: http://crochet.about.com/od/babypatterns/a/simple-baby-blanket-free-crochet-pattern.htm
Hook: 5mm
Yarn: Bernat Baby Sport Solid in Baby Blue + Scraps of Acryllic off-white yarn from my stash.
Pattern Modifications:
Added 10 extra sts to base chain. Doesn’t change stitch pattern.
Border Rnd 4:
The pattern as written added lots of ruffle. Since I wanted it to lay flat, I modified it a bit.
On the sides, puff st in every ch 1 sp, and dc2tog over the 2 dc sts between spaces. On the corners, dc in each dc of the previous rnd, and puff st into each ch 1 space.
(Puff st = yo and pull up a loop 4x then yo and pull through all 9 loops on hook, ch 1 to finish off puff)


Cross & Cluster Blanket
Pattern Link: http://www.redheart.com/free-patterns/one-ball-baby-blanket
Hook: 6mm
Yarn: Caron One Pound
No Pattern Modifications
[No picture available yet]

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Rainy Day Moebius Cowl

This project was by request for Vicky. Since she already know's what she's getting, I'll go ahead and post the details.

The pattern I started with is the Snowy Day Moebius Neckwarmer Hood by Gardener's Ramblings.
I found this pattern through Ravelry, and I modified it quite a bit.

I only had one skein left of this beautiful yarn, plus, Vicky was looking for something to go with her fall coat, as it is more for rainy days (keeping her hair & glasses dry) rather than for cold and snowy days. So I chose a larger hook and a bulky yarn to make it breathable, and yet comfy.

Yarn: Lion Brand Homespun in Barrington (336)
Hook: 10.0mm (N)


Base chain was 50sts + 3 for the turning ch.
I just did a dc in each st, following the pattern for making it a moebius. Honestly, with this yarn and hook, I think it would have been great to follow the pattern as written, and I definitely had enough yarn (used the WHOLE skein). However, when I started, I wasn't sure how it would turn out.

Moral of the story: this was SUPER easy to make, and its my new favorite project. It worked up in a little less than 2 hours, and its super soft. I never liked the look or the "gimmick" of the moebius stuff before, but this was honestly a great piece and I'm definitely going to make more. Plus its a one-skein project! You can never have enough 2 hour (or less) one skein projects around Christmas time. I'm just sayin.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

30-Minute Hat

I designed this hat to go along with my 90-Minute Scarf project. It is worked with 2 strands of worsted weight yarn, held together and worked as if they were one strand. In this project, both strands are pulled from the same skein, but you could use different yarns. It takes about 30 minutes to complete this project. I finished it in about 45, while cooking dinner, and with time taken to photograph a tutorial.

Yarn: Bernat Super Saver Solid [Worsted Weight Acrylic Yarn]
         Work two strands together as if they were one
Hook: US 9.0mm (N)
Hat Size: Adult
Find this pattern on Ravelry

Special Stitches: Front post double crochet (fpdc) and back post double crochet (bpdc)
See my FPDC/BPDC Stitch Tutorial for how to do these stitches. If you are uncomfortable with these stitches, just omit them. You will then work rnds 10 & 11 the same as rnd 5. After that, you may choose to add an additional rnd of (ch 1, sc into each st around, sl st to join) if you want to snug up the bottom.

Begin by making a magic ring. (See this tutorial I found on youtube)

RND 1: Once you have made the magic ring, ch 3, and do 8 dc into the ring. Tighten ring and sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.

RND 2: Ch 3, do 2dc into each dc from the previous rnd. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.

RND 3: Ch 3, dc into the first dc, *2dc into the next dc st, and 1 dc into the following st* Repeat from * to * around until the end of the rnd. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.


RND 4: Ch 3, dc into each of the next 2 sts. *2 dc into the next dc st, and 1 dc in each of the next 3 sts* Repeat from * to * around. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.


RNDS 5 - 9: Ch 3, 1 dc into each st around. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.

RND 10: Ch 3 *fpdc into the next st, bpdc into the following st* Repeat from * to * around. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.

RND 11: Ch 3 *fpdc into each fpdc and bpdc into each bpdc* around. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join. fasten off.

Rnds 10 & 11 should give your hat a snug but stretchy band around the ears.


EDIT:

Some people have had trouble getting their hat to be the right size. When working with 2 strands of yarn and a larger hook, gauge can vary dramatically from person to person. I strongly recommend that you try on your hat frequently to make sure it is the right size.

To make the hat wider, do this for your row 5:
Ch 3, dc into each of the next 3 sts. *2 dc into the next dc st, and 1 dc in each of the next 4 sts* Repeat from * to * around. sl st into the top of your initial ch 3 to join.

To make the hat longer, repeat the row 9 pattern for an extra 1-3 rows, depending upon how much longer the hat needs to be. Try it on as you work!

Monday, November 7, 2011

Stitch Tutorial: FPDC & BPDC

So, with my blog becoming more popular, I'm getting more and more requests for video's & photo tutorials. I don't think I have the energy/patience for video tutorials, but I can take pix of my work to try and help you out.

(In these photos, I'm working 2 strands of green yarn together as one, to make my 30-minute hat, so please keep this in mind when looking at it.)

Both of these stitches MUST BEGIN with a row/round of regular dc sts prior to starting the row/rnd that is fpdc/bpdc.


Front Post Double Crochet (FPDC):

This stitch is essentially a plain dc st, but instead of putting your hook into the stitch as you normally would, you put it behind the "post" of the dc directly below that st. 


Insert your Hook behind the "post" of the dc that is directly below where you would normally make your dc stitch.

Yarn over, as with a normal dc.

Pull the yarn through, behind the "post" of the dc. This pushes the stitch from the previous row/rnd to the front of your work also.

As with your normal dc, yo again, and complete the dc st as normal. You may want to do this a little loosely until you get used to doing fpdc sts, as they tend to be bulkier sts in general.

Back Post Double Crochet (BPDC):

This stitch is the inverse of the FPDC. Again, it is a dc st that is essentially worked around the post of the dc below where you would normally put your st. This time, however, you will be putting your hook in front of that stitch, pushing it to the back of the work.

Insert your hook from the back of your work to the front, to the right of the dc that you're going to work with. This should be the "post" that lies directly below the st where you would normally put your st.

Push the hook over the post of that dc, and to then the back of your work (using the space to the left of the dc's post). In this photo, the post of the dc is hidden behind the hook, as it should be with your work

Yarn over, and pull the loop all the way through to the front, so that you're left with 3 loops on your hook. This pushes the dc st from the previous row/rnd to the back of your work.

Yarn over and complete the dc st as you normally would.

Alternating your FPDC and BPDC sts can create a ribbed effect. It also tightens up your stitches, while at the same time adding a stretchy quality, so its great for the bottom of hats or the tops of socks/leggings. Some patterns will have you add FPDC sts only, and this creates a line of ribbing that is on the front side of your material only.

If you are new to crochet, and trying to learn many stitches, I HIGHLY recommend you buy the book "Stitch and Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker". It has great instructions with pictures on how to do almost every stitch you'll ever need, along with how to read patterns, how to read stitch grids, how to troubleshoot your work, and some basic patterns to help you get started. No, I'm not associated with the book/publishers/author in any way. I just love the book, and all the crochetters in my local craft group reference it constantly.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Living Statue Costume

As part of our haunted house this year, we wanted a living statue out front as a "mild" scare and to help pass out candy. We also wanted it to be very cheap.


The dress was made from 4 yds of clearance gray fabric I got for $3/yd at Joann's. It was folded in half, and I cut the sleeves without any scrap. (see diagram)
Fabric is folded in half long-way, and draped over the shoulders.
Cut along the red lines, and sew along the blue lines, with the right sides togther.
Measure room for shoulder and chest before cutting.


The belt was then braided from approximately 75 yards of yarn left over from my wig yarn. (15 pieces of yarn, 5 yards each)

I cut off about 4" all around the hem, and added that to the wooden base (made from scrap wood) that I was going to stand on.

I set the dress, belt and candy bowl (which is set on an up-side down round trash can we had in the garage) on the stand and attacked it all with 2 different shades of grey spray paint. ($4 per can from Lowes)

The make-up was cheap grease paint from the halloween store. I had some already in my kit that I purchased last year.



Total Supplies: $12 in fabric, $8 in spray paint, $3 in yarn, scrap wood, make-up, and old trash can with old bowl to hold candy.

See my most recent post for the pattern on how to make the yarn wig.

Halloween Wig Pattern

I created this pattern in order to have an extremely inexpensive wig to wear as part of my living statue costume. I imagine this pattern would also work well for a Raggedy Ann type of wig.

Yarn: Caron, Red Heart, or other worsted Weight yarn (this was in my stash) approx 300 yrds
Hook: 5.5 mm
Supplies: sewing needle and matching thread

Special Stitch: V-Stitch (V-st)
triple crochet (tr), ch 1, triple crochet (tr)

Wig Base:
You are essentially making a stretchy hat. If you plan to leave the hair on the wig down, instead of styled, consider using a basic dc or hdc hat pattern to give you more coverage beneath the strands of hair.

Ch 4, sl st into 1st ch to forn a ring.
RND 1: Ch 5, tr into ring. (this represents a v-st) 5 V-sts into ring. sl st to 4th ch of the ch 5 that began the rnd.
RND 2: Ch 5, tr into the first V-st of previous rnd. V-st into the SAME st. 2 V-st into each V-st of previous rnd. sl st to 4th ch of the ch 5 that began the rnd.
RND 3: Ch 5, trc into the first V-st of the previous rnd. *2 V-st into the next st. 1 V-st into the following st.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the rnd. sl st to 4th ch of the ch 5 that began the rnd.
RND 4: : Ch 5, trc into the first V-st of the previous rnd. One V-st into each st around. sl st to join.

Repeat Rnd 4 until the hat is long enough to cover your hairline (and if desired, your ears). My wig base was a total of 7 rnds. Fasten off.

Once the base of your hat is completed, select a length of hair strands for your wig. Cut lengths of yarn that are approximately double how long you want the hair to be. Slip knot the strands of hair onto the tr sts that make up the v-sts.







The following pictures represent a top view of the hat, and the lines represent approximately where I knotted in the strands of hair. The blue pattern represents what I did for a braid/bun wig. The red represents what you might want to do for a pigtail wig.

Once all of your strands are tied in, place your wig onto a foam head, or lay it on a bent knee to give it shape. Using coordinating thread, stitch shut the center part of the hair. Lay the hair flat and loosely place it into a style. Stitch the strands to the wig base LOOSELY with a running stitch in order to help hold your style. Secure the style with scraps of yarn or hair bands. Trim as desired.



My wig was spray painted to match the colors of my costume better, but this wasn't totally necessary.

Monday, October 24, 2011

Baby Hoodie

Found this pattern through Ravelry and finished it a few weeks ago, but never got the pix off my camera to post them.

This "Cozy Hoodie" pattern is through the Bernat website, so it's free, you just have to give them a junk email address and sign up. I did have some gauge issues with this one, so I ended up going by the measurements written as opposed to stitch count, which was fine. I also feel like I should note that I love the way this worked up with the Red Heart Super Savers Camo. I generally HATE the way that yarn works up with dc or larger sts, but the sc and sc + ch patterns seem to look much better. In case you were ever thinking about buying that yarn.

Oh, I did add some gussets under the arms to add flexibility (seeing as it IS for a child) but I kinda freehanded those, and I don't remember now what I did.

Saturday, October 22, 2011

Unicorn Hat


Inspiration: Hot Topic's Unicorn Knit Hat (which is crochet, and not knit)
Yarn: Red Heart Super Saver (Acryllic Worsed Weight Yarn)
Approximately 150 yards of white, 50 yards of Lavender, scraps of Pink, Black, Green & Blue
Hook: 5.0mm
Gauge: Fit hat portion to head, gauge itself is unimportant
Additional Items: several handfuls of stuffing, 4-6 safety pins, yarn needle

HAT
Start with a magic loop or ch3 and sl st to form a ring
RND 1: ch 3 and 11 dc into ring. Sl st into top of ch 3 to join.
RND 2: ch 3, 2 dc into each dc of previous round. Sl st into top of ch 3 to join.
RND 3: Ch 3, *1dc in next st, 2 dc in following st* repeat from * to * around. Sl st into top of ch 3 to join.
RND 4: Ch 3, *1dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in following st* Repeat from * to * around. Sl st into top of ch 3 to join.
RNDS 5- 13: Ch 3, 1dc in each st around, Sl st into top of ch 3 to join.
Fasten off at the end of RND 13. Using safety pins, mark where you would like the earflaps to be, as each will be 12 sts wide.

EARFLAPS
Row 1: Join yarn in st marked with a pin and ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc in each st across to next pin. Ch 3 and turn (12 sts)
Row 2: skip 1st st, dc next 2 sts tog, dc in each st to last 2 sts. Dc2tog, then dc into the top of the ch 3 made to begin the row. Ch 3 and Turn (10 sts)
Row 3: Dc2tog, dc in each st to last 2 sts. Dc2tog, then dc into the top of the ch 3 made to begin the row. Ch 3 and Turn (9 sts)
Row 4: Dc2tog, dc in each st to last 2 sts. Dc2tog, then dc into the top of the ch 3 made to begin the row. Ch 3 and Turn (8 sts)
Row 5: Dc2tog, dc in each st to last 2 sts. Dc2tog, then dc into the top of the ch 3 made to begin the row. Ch 3 and Turn (7 sts)
Row 6: Dc2tog 3 times, dc into the top of the ch 3 made to begin the row. ch 1 and turn (5 sts)
Row 7: sc2tog, sc into next st, sc2 tog using last st and top of ch 3 (this helps make the edge smooth.  (3 sts)
Repeat for the other ear flap.
When adding straps: decided on what length you want (approx.  12” – 20”) and cut 12 lengths of yarn that are DOUBLE the desired length. (in whatever colors you prefer) Fold the lengths of yarn in half, and slip-knot 4 strands through each of the 3 sts at the bottom of the ear flap. Braid them and tie off.
(I know plenty of patterns that would tell you 6 strands is the ideal amount to use, and that’s fine, but I like a hearty braid with a thicker tassel at the end)

NOSE:
RND 1: ch 4 and sc in 2nd ch from hook. Sc in next st, and 2 sc in the last st.
DO NOT TURN. Begin working in the round. Sc in the back of the st that you just put 2sc into. 1 sc into the back of the next st.  2sc into the back of the next st, which should bring you back  to the first sc you made. Sl st in this st to join the round.
RND 2: Ch 1, sc into next 3 sts, 2sc in each of next 2 sts, sc in each of next 2 sts, 2sc in each of next 2 sts, sl st to to join.
RND 3: ch 1, sc into next 3 sts, *2sc in next st, sc in following st* twice. Sc in next 3 sts. Repeat from * to * twice. Sl st to join.
RND 4: ch 1, sc in next 4 sts.* 2sc in following st,  1sc in each of next 2 sts, and 2 sc in following st* sc in each of next 5 sts. Repeat from * to * then sc in each remaining st of the rnd. Sl st to join.
RND 5: ch 1, sc in each of next 5 sts, 2sc in next st, sc in each of next 11 sts, 2sc in next st, sc in each remaining st of the rnd. Sl st to join.
RND 6: ch 1, sc in each of next 7 sts, 2sc in next st, sc in each of next 11 sts, 2sc in next st, sc in each remaining st of the rnd. Sl st to join.
RND 7: ch 1, sc in each st around. Sl st to join. Fasten off.
Nostrils: Using black yarn and yarn needle, add some nostrils on your unicorn’s nose.
To attach: Safety Pin in place, and use yarn needle w/ scraps of white yarn to stitch it about 80% of the way around. Add light stuffing, then finish stitching around.

EARS: (make 2)
With Pink, make a magic ring.
RND 1: 8 sc into ring. Tighten magic ring, and sl st to join.
RND 2: ch 1, 2sc into each st, sl st to join.
RND 3: ch 1, *sc in next st, 2 sc into following st*  repeat from * to * 3 more times. Sl st into following st. Leave remaining sts unworked
ROW 4:
Turn, do not ch. Sl st into the last sc of the previous row and in the following sc. Sc in each of the next 2 sts. Hdc in each of the next 4 sts, sc in each of the next 2 sts, sl st in next st. Turn.
Row 5:
Do not ch. Sl st into the last sc of the previous row and in the following sc. Sc in next st. hdc in next st. 2 hdc in next st. hdc in next st. sc in next st. sl st into next 2 sts. Fasten off.
Select  1 st that is the bottom center (these are the sts that were left unworked after RND 3). Mark the sts on either side of your center st. these 3 sts will serve as your open area to stuff the ear (if you so desire) and should remain unworked. With the RS facing, and pins at the top of your work, join white to the left of the left pin.
Row 6: ch 1 and sc in each of the next 7 sts. 2hdc in next st, 1hdc in following st, and 2 hdc in next st. sc in each remaining st around to the other pin (leaving the st with the pin unworked). Ch 1 and turn
Row 7: (work in back Loop ONLY this whole row). sc in each of the first 7 sts. 2 sc in next st. sc in each of the following 2 sts. 2sc in next st. sc in each st around to end of row. ch 1 and turn.
Row 8: (Resume working through both loops of sts). Sc in each of the next 6 sts. *Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Sc in next st* Repeat from * to * 3 times. Sc around to end of row. ch 1 and turn.
Row 9: Sc in each of the next 4 sts. Sc2tog 5 times. Sc in final 4 sts. Ch 1 and turn.
Row 10: Sc in each of the first 4 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Sc in next st. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Sc in final 4 sts. Ch 1 and turn.
Row 11: Sc in each of the first 3 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Sc in next st. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Sc in final 3 sts. Fasten off.
Seam up the back using white yarn and yarn needle. Stuff ears lightly and attach.

HORN:
With Lavender, ch 12 and sl st to form a ring.
RND 1: ch 1, 14 sc into ring. Sl St to join. (14 sts)
RND 2: Ch 1, sc  into each st around. Sl St to join.
RND 3: Ch 1, sc  into each st around. Sl St to join.
RND 4: Ch 1, sc2tog, sc in each st around. Sl St to join.
RNDS 5-10: Repeat Rnds 3-4 a total of 6 additional times, until only 6 sts remain
RND 11: Ch 1, sc2tog 3 times. Loosten the loop on the hook and sl st to ch1 st to join. This should pull the top shut. Fasten off.
Overstuff the horn to make it more solid. Attach to the hat using scraps of the lavender yarn.

EYES:
Using black yarn, make a magic ring, or ch 2 and work in the second ch from hook.
RND 1: Sc 8 sts into ring, sl st to join.
RND 2: Ch 1, 2sc into each st around, sl st to join. Fasten Off.
You may also choose to use buttons , or glue on rhinestones for the eyes.

MANE:
Using all the colors of yarn, cut a ton of pieces that are 10-12” in length. Taking 2 pieces at a time, slip knot them around the dc sts that make up the hat. You can make the mane as full or as long as you like. I kept mine short, so that it wouldn’t go on the nape of the neck when worn.






Modifications to make a child sized version (untested):
Use a  4.0mm hook

HAT:
Skip RND 4 of hat pattern. Fasten off after RND 10.
On Earflaps, begin with 10 sts instead of 12. Follow Row 2 as written, ending with 8 sts. Then follow pattern from Row 5 onward.

NOSE:
follow RNDs 1-3 as written.
RND 4: ch 1, sc into each st around. Sl st to join
Rnd 5: ch 1, sc into each of next 4 sts. 2 sc into following st.  sc in each of the next 8 sts, 2 sc in following st. sc in each sts to finish the round, sl st to join
Rnd 6: ch 1, sc in each st around, sl st to join. Fasten off.
Add nostrils, stuff, and attach.

HORN:
Begin with Ch 8 and sl st to form ring.
RND 1: Ch 1, 10 sc into ring. Sl St to join.
RND 2: Ch 1, sc  into each st around. Sl St to join.
RND 3: Ch 1, sc  into each st around. Sl St to join.
RND 4: Ch 1, sc2tog, sc in each st around. Sl St to join.
RNDS 5-7: Repeat Rnds 3-4 a total of 3 additional times, until only 6 sts remain
RND 8: Ch 1, sc2tog 3 times. Loosten the loop on the hook and sl st to ch1 st to join. This should pull the top shut. Fasten off.
Overstuff the horn to make it more solid. Attach to the hat using scraps of the lavender yarn.

EARS:
So, I think the larger ears would look cute on a smaller hat. However, you could try skipping Row 4 and just reducing the sts of each rnd accordingly. If I ever get around to testing the child version of this pattern, I will make sure to post ammedments.




Monday, September 19, 2011

Crafts Where Art Thou?

So, I haven't stopped crochetting, I just haven't had pictures to post.

I did make myself a laptop case out of a leftover skein of homespun (freehand), and I made my step-sister a cute shrug hat from a pattern on ravelry, which unfortunately has a broken link where the pattern should be. I might make another, in which case I'll post my version of it.

I also made a "Swiffer Sock" which is my new favorite project:
http://blog.craftzine.com/archive/2010/03/craft_pattern_crocheted_revers.html
Since I can never remember to buy more swiffer pads at the store, AND its more eco friendly, AND I'm trying to clear out my yarn stash.


Oh, and it finally hit me: Christmas is sneaking up on us!!!
I had a bunch of stashed yarn from last year's Black Friday sales that was reserved to make my dad a sweater. At some point I decided to knit it instead of crochet, and then I somehow screwed up the gauge (which I ALWAYS do when I knit) and it ended up in my pile of UFOs. So last week I decided to crochet it instead (which was the original plan) and attempt to get it done in time for christmas. I also picked up a few skeins to make hats and scarves and dishtowels and smaller holiday projects. SO MANY PROJECTS! But at least this time people know what they're getting. No secrets means I can work on their projects in front of them. Its a nice change of pace.